Search

The legal battle that keeps Argentine music in suspense!

Argentina | Music | 21st September 2021 | Virtual Wire

Picture -plymouthmagazine


On Saturday afternoon, spanish streamer Ibai Llanos premiered a new episode of “Charlando Tranquilamente”, a programme recorded from his personal studio and to which he invites different entertainment figures.

Who participated this time was Myke Towers, the Puerto Rican singer, who by oversight would have confirmed the BZRP Music Session #23, starring Paulo Londra. On the other hand, Londra's side said that his participation was quite relative, referring to the fact that number 23 was reserved for Towers, who was the other great candidate to take it forward.


In the 35th minute of the chat, Ibai asks him: "Bizarrap has skipped number 23 of their sessions. You know there's the Myke Towers rumour, 23, Michael Jordan...". To which he replies that when he met Bizarrap he told him that he wanted that session for him, but that

the producer told him: "look what it says there". The 23rd said Paulo Londra.


While the Puerto Rican took this comment lightly, Ibai and his partner couldn't believe what

Towers had revealed. “You just made a spoiler...", said Ibai. "You kind of didn't know, did you? It was a secret," he said with a chuckle. Immediately, Towers reacted. "My bad Biza, I owe you. People’ 've got me crazy asking me about the sessions."But why so much effusiveness with a session that, at first sight, looks just like the rest? Paulo Londra listened to Spanish artists during 2018 in Argentina. He had high numbers of plays on all platforms, but this didn’t prevent his future from being altered.

Picture -https://noelmaurer.typepad.com/


In 2019, Paulo Londra signed a contract with Colombian producer Ovy On The Drums. In it,

the Cordovan was accused of being swindled by his production company, Big Ligas, which would be granted all his musical rights, both songs and vocals, until 2025. This forced him to stop his musical career and stop producing. In March 2020, he filed a lawsuit alleging that the company had defrauded him by making him sign a contract for a three-year joint venture agreement memo, which, according to legal documents, was extended without his consent.


Two years after founding the Big Ligas label, Salazar and Oviedo filed a lawsuit against the singer-songwriter accusing him of breach of contract and indebtedness since he failed to

deliver new music despite being bound by the agreement. At the same time, Londra filed a lawsuit accusing Salazar and Oviedo of fraud and negligent representation, in which he alleged that he was "tricked" into signing the memo that launched Big Ligas, thinking it was the filming of a music video scene for a song of his. "I didn't want to disappoint anyone by showing my fears and disagreements and I just went ahead and moved on and, as always I got the best rhymes out of me to make it clear that I can," was how Londra explained how this legal headache began.


While at first, the outlook was pretty uncertain, a fortnight ago Billboard magazine posted a

tweet that read: "A judge ruled that the Argentine trap artist has no further recording obligations or future contractual obligations to Big Ligas, the label he helped co-found". This, obviously, made the networks explode, positioning him among the top trends in the country. However, within minutes the tweet was deleted, so it was ruled to be fake news, so the hashtag #FreePaulo went viral again and a post dedicated to the music industry made the rounds.

Picture -billboard


"A judge granted Big Ligas an emergency motion to review the denial of the stay of the order determining ownership of the property, placing a temporary stay on the verdict pending further review," they clarified about the legal bid between Londra and his former label, who appealed and asked for a new review on the expected termination of the contract they signed in 2018. A few hours later, Londra posted a story on Instagram. "Immense joy. Thank you all, thank you, God. It's a first and big step. Not long to go," he wrote.